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851 results, from 841
  • SOEPpapers 295 / 2010

    Multidimensional Measurement of Richness: Theory and an Application to Germany

    Closely following recent innovations in the literature on the multidimensional measurement of poverty, this paper provides similar measures for the top of the distribution using a dual cutoff method to identify individuals, who can be considered as rich in a multidimensional setting. We use this framework to analyze the role of wealth, health and education, in addition to income, as dimensions of multidimensional ...

    2010| Andreas Peichl, Nico Pestel
  • SOEPpapers 498 / 2012

    International Migration as Occupational Mobility

    We investigate whether Germans immigrants to the US work in higher-status occupations than they would have had they remained in Germany. We account for potential bias from selective migration. The probability of migration is identified using life-cycle and cohort variation in economic conditions in the US. We also explore whether occupational choices vary for Germans who migrated as children or as ...

    2012| Dean R. Lillard, Anna Manzoni
  • SOEPpapers 224 / 2009

    Risk Attitudes and Investment Decisions across European Countries: Are Women More Conservative Investors than Men?

    This study questions the popular stereotype that women are more risk averse than men in their financial investment decisions. The analysis is based on micro-level data from large-scale surveys of private households in five European countries. In our analysis of investment decisions, we directly account for individuals' self-perceivedwillingness to take financial risks. The empirical evidence we provide ...

    2009| Oleg Badunenko, Nataliya Barasinska, Dorothea Schäfer
  • Diskussionspapiere 928 / 2009

    Risk Attitudes and Investment Decisions across European Countries: Are Women More Conservative Investors than Men?

    This study questions the popular stereotype that women are more risk averse than men in their financial investment decisions. The analysis is based on micro-level data from large-scale surveys of private households in five European countries. In our analysis of investment decisions, we directly account for individuals' self-perceived willingness to take financial risks. The empirical evidence we provide ...

    2009| Oleg Badunenko, Nataliya Barasinska, Dorothea Schäfer
  • SOEPpapers 483 / 2012

    The Impact of Social Support Networks on Maternal Employment: A Comparison of West German, East German and Migrant Mothers of Pre-School Children

    Given shortages in public child care in Germany, this paper asks whether social support with child care and domestic work by spouses, kin and friends can facilitate mothers' return to full-time or part-time positions within the first six years after birth. Using SOEP data from 1993-2009 and event history analyses for competing risks, the author compares the employment transitions of West German, East ...

    2012| Mareike Wagner
  • SOEPpapers 722 / 2014

    Maternity Leave and Its Consequences for Subsequent Careers in Germany

    This paper analyzes the wage development of mothers interrupting their careers, in comparison to the wages of men who do not face a parental interruption. We estimate OLS regression models for different subcategories defined by age and point in time. We use data from the German Socioeconomic Panel from 1984 to 2011, to show that wages and the financial penalty for maternity differ according to the ...

    2014| Nele E. Franz
  • SOEPpapers 600 / 2013

    Mental Illness and Unhappiness

    This paper is a contribution to the second World Happiness Report. It makes five main points. 1. Mental health is the biggest single predictor of life-satisfaction. This is so in the UK, Germany and Australia even if mental health is included with a six-year lag. It explains more of the variance of life-satisfaction in the population of a country than physical health does, and much more than unemployment ...

    2013| Richard Layard, Dan Chisholm, Vikram Patel, Shekhar Saxena
  • SOEPpapers 329 / 2010

    Are Education and Entrepreneurial Income Endogenous and Do Family Background Variables Make Sense as Instruments? A Bayesian Analysis

    Education is a well-known driver of (entrepreneurial) income. The measurement of its influence, however, suffers from endogeneity suspicion. For instance, ability and occupational choice are mentioned as driving both the level of (entrepreneurial) income and of education. Using instrumental variables can provide a way out. However, three questions remain: whether endogeneity is really present, whether ...

    2010| Jörn H. Block, Lennart F. Hoogerheide, A. Roy Thurik
  • Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung 1 / 2001

    Success at Work, Life Patterns, and Overall Life Satisfaction: Changes in the Lives of Men and Women since the 1980s in West Germany

    This paper focuses on the structural relationship between family building and upward mobility. Typically this relationship is analyzed for women only, while we include men as well. With new patterns of intimate partnerships and non-traditional families, on the one hand, and a changing labor market, on the other hand, new assertions about their connection have emerged. Using SOEP-data, the possible ...

    2001| Angelika Tölke
  • SOEPpapers 635 / 2014

    A Weighty Issue Revisited: The Dynamic Effect of Body Weight on Earnings and Satisfaction in Germany

    We estimate the relationship between changes in the body mass index (bmi) and wages or satisfaction, respectively, in a panel of German employees. In contrast to previous literature, the dynamic models indicate that there is an inverse u-shaped association between bmi and wages among young workers. Among young male workers, work satisfaction is affected beyond the effect on earnings. Our finding of ...

    2014| Frieder Kropfhäußer, Marco Sunder
851 results, from 841
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