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119 results, from 11
DIW Weekly Report 13/14 / 2018

Household Consumption and Savings Rate Depend Strongly on Employment Status, Income, and Age

On what and to what extent private households in Germany spend money varies significantly depending on employment status, income, and age. As this study based on the most current official sample survey of income and expenditure from 2013 shows, unemployed households on average spend over half of their income on basic needs such as living and food expenses while unemployed people living alone spend ...

2018| Karl Brenke, Jan Pfannkuche
Interview

"Uncertainty remains one of the biggest impediments to global economic development": Eight Questions for Ferdinand Fichtner

Mr. Fichtner, is the German economy still on a path of growth? Yes—in fact, the German economy is developing quite powerfully. Growth in the first half of the year has been respectable, but we are expecting an even more significant expansion in the coming quarters, especially in light of the favorable labor market development.  [...]

21.06.2017| Ferdinand Fichtner
Economic Bulletin

Hourly wages in lower deciles no longer lagging behind when it comes to wage growth

For many years, only better-paid workers benefited from Germany’s real wage increases. In contrast, dependent employees with lower hourly wages suffered substantial losses, while the low-wage sector expanded. Around 2010, these trends came to an end. Now all wage groups benefit from wage increases—even if those in the middle of the distribution lag somewhat behind. At the very least, this ...

24.05.2017| Karl Brenke, Alexander S. Kritikos
DIW Economic Bulletin 45 / 2017

Youth in Europe: Unemployment Falling but Major Labor Market Problems Persist

In spring 2013, youth unemployment in the EU peaked and then declined sharply. Yet at least one in every six members of the economically active population between age 15 and 24 in the EU is still unemployed, and the unemployment rate among young persons is still 2.5 times higher than that of adults. The present study shows how young people’s situation in the labor market has developed since 2013. The ...

2017| Karl Brenke
DIW Economic Bulletin 21 / 2017

Hourly Wages in Lower Deciles No Longer Lagging behind When It Comes to Wage Growth

For many years, only better-paid workers benefited from Germany’s real wage increases. In contrast, dependent employees with lower hourly wages suffered substantial losses, while the low-wage sector expanded. Around 2010, these trends came to an end. Now all wage groups benefit from wage increases—even if those in the middle of the distribution lag somewhat behind. At the very least, this new pattern ...

2017| Karl Brenke, Alexander S. Kritikos
DIW Economic Bulletin 3/4 / 2017

Refugee Integration: A Worthwile Investment

The initial fiscal costs associated with refugee integration are quite high—but as more and more refugees join the labor force, a reduction in ongoing welfare costs and an increase in government revenue will result. Against this background, the Institute for Employment Research (IAB) in Nuremberg and DIW Berlin conducted a joint investigation (funded by the German Federal Ministry of Labor and Social ...

2017| Stefan Bach, Herbert Brücker, Peter Haan, Agnese Romiti, Kristina van Deuverden, Enzo Weber
DIW Economic Bulletin 33/34/35 / 2017

Increased Labor Market Participation Can't Do the Job of Mastering Germany's Demographic Change in the Future

In the last decade the available labor force has expanded in Germany—despite the decline in the working-age population. The reason: labor market participation has increased, for women in particular and older people in general. Also noticeable was a rise in qualification level because well-educated people have a particularly high propensity to participate in the labor market. Most recently, Germany’s ...

2017| Karl Brenke, Marius Clemens
Research Project

Structural Data on Production and Employment in the Construction Industry

Completed Project| Firms and Markets, Forecasting and Economic Policy
DIW Economic Bulletin 8 / 2016

Home Offices: Plenty of Untapped Potential

As far as the share of individuals with a home office is concerned, Germany is below the EU average and lags considerably behind other countries such as France, the UK, or the Scandinavian countries. Only 12 percent of all employees in Germany work primarily or occasionally from home, although this would theoretically be possible in 40 percent of jobs. In most cases, an employee’s desire to work from ...

2016| Karl Brenke
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