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114 results, from 81
  • Externe Monographien

    Do Women in Highly Qualified Positions Face Higher Work-to-Family Conflicts in Germany Than Men?

    Changing employment conditions lead to new chances, but also new risks for employees. In the literature, increasing permeability between occupational and private life is discussed as one special outcome of this development that employees must face, especially those in highly qualified positions. Drawing on existing research, we investigate in how far women and men in those positions differ in their ...

    Bonn: IZA, 2017, 50 S.
    (Discussion Paper Series / Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit ; 10716)
    | Anne Busch-Heizmann, Elke Holst
  • DIW Economic Bulletin 43 / 2017

    There Is a Lot Left to Do to Reach Gender Equality in Germany: Editorial

    2017| Katharina Wrohlich
  • DIW Economic Bulletin 43 / 2017

    Gender Pay Gap Varies Greatly by Occupation

    The German labor market is characterized by marked occupational segregation between women and men. The median earnings in female dominated occupations are lower than those in male dominated professions. This is one of the reasons for the gender pay gap. However, there are also large differences in earnings between men and women within occupations. These profession-specific gender pay gaps are smaller ...

    2017| Katharina Wrohlich, Aline Zucco
  • Diskussionspapiere 1662 / 2017

    Why Do Women Favor Same-Gender Competition? Evidence from a Choice Experiment

    This paper addresses the behavioral puzzle of women’s preference for competition when competitors are also women. Using a framed field experiment with 883 non-standard subjects, we show that none of the determinants of competitive behavior in general, including ability, self-confidence and risk aversion, provide a satisfying explanation for women’s substantive gender-related selection into competition. ...

    2017| Norma Burow, Miriam Beblo, Denis Beninger, Melanie Schröder
  • SOEPpapers 904 / 2017

    Do Women in Highly Qualified Positions Face Higher Work-To-Family Conflicts in Germany than Men?

    Changing employment conditions lead to new chances, but also new risks for employees. In the literature, increasing permeability between occupational and private life is discussed as one special outcome of this development that employees must face, especially those in highly qualified positions. Drawing on existing research, we investigate in how far women and men in those positions differ in their ...

    2017| Anne Busch-Heizmann, Elke Holst
  • Diskussionspapiere 1658 / 2017

    Do Women in Highly Qualified Positions Face Higher Work-To-Family Conflicts in Germany than Men?

    Changing employment conditions lead to new chances, but also new risks for employees. In the literature, increasing permeability between occupational and private life is discussed as one special outcome of this development that employees must face, especially those in highly qualified positions. Drawing on existing research, we investigate in how far women and men in those positions differ in their ...

    2017| Anne Busch-Heizmann, Elke Holst
  • Diskussionspapiere 1657 / 2017

    Fathers, Parental Leave and Gender Norms

    Social norms and attitudes towards gender roles have been shown to have a large effect on economic outcomes of men and women. Many countries have introduced policies that aim at changing gender stereotypes, for example fathers’ quota in parental leave schemes. In this paper, we analyze whether the introduction of the fathers’ quota in Germany in 2007, that caused a sharp increase in the take-up of ...

    2017| Ulrike Unterhofer, Katharina Wrohlich
  • DIW Economic Bulletin 22/23 / 2017

    The Gender Gap in Competitiveness: Women Shy away from Competing with Others, but Not from Competing with Themselves

    Women are less willing than men to compete against others. This gender gap can partially explain the differences between women’s and men’s education and career choices, and the labor market disparities that result. The experiments presented here show that even though women are less willing than men to compete against others, they are just as willing as men are to take on the challenge of improving ...

    2017| Johanna Mollerstrom, Katharina Wrohlich
  • DIW Economic Bulletin 1/2 / 2017

    Financial Sector: Banks Fall behind and Now Have a Lower Proportion of Women on Executive and Advisory Boards than Insurance Companies

    Women are still in the clear minority among the financial sector’s top decision-making bodies. According to DIW Berlin’s Women Executives Barometer, at the end of 2016, 21 percent of the supervisory and administrative board members of the 100 largest banks were female. The number has stagnated compared to last year. Since 2010, when the discussion about the gender quota for supervisory boards gained ...

    2017| Elke Holst, Katharina Wrohlich
  • DIW Economic Bulletin 1/2 / 2017

    Companies Should Have More Women on All Levels of the Hierarchy: Seven Questions for Elke Holst

    2017
114 results, from 81
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