Skip to content!

Search Publications

clear
0 filter(s) selected
close
Go to page
remove add
37 results, from 11
Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung 1 / 2018

Stupsen und Schubsen (Nudging): ein neues verhaltensbasiertes Regulierungskonzept?

2018| Jana Friedrichsen, Kornelia Hagen, Lilo Wagner
Diskussionspapiere 2000 / 2022

How Communication Makes the Difference between a Cartel and Tacit Collusion: A Machine Learning Approach

This paper sheds new light on the role of communication for cartel formation. Using machine learning to evaluate free-form chat communication among firms in a laboratory experiment, we identify typical communication patterns for both explicit cartel formation and indirect attempts to collude tacitly. We document that firms are less likely to communicate explicitly about price fixing and more likely ...

2022| Maximilian Andres, Lisa Bruttel, Jana Friedrichsen
Diskussionspapiere 1971 / 2021

Face Mask Use and Physical Distancing before and after Mandatory Masking: No Evidence on Risk Compensation in Public Waiting Lines

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the introduction of mandatory face mask usage triggered a heated debate. A major point of debate is whether community use of masks creates a false sense of security that would diminish physical distancing, counteracting any potential direct benefit from masking. We conducted a randomized field experiment in Berlin, Germany, to investigate how masks affect distancing and ...

2021| Gyula Seres, Anna Balleyer, Nicola Cerutti, Jana Friedrichsen, Müge Süer
Diskussionspapiere 1926 / 2021

The Leniency Rule Revisited: Experiments on Cartel Formation with Open Communication

The experimental literature on antitrust enforcement provides robust evidence that communication plays an important role for the formation and stability of cartels. We extend these studies through a design that distinguishes between innocuous communication and communication about a cartel, sanctioning only the latter. To this aim, we introduce a participant in the role of the competition authority, ...

2021| Maximilian Andres, Lisa Bruttel, Jana Friedrichsen
Diskussionspapiere 1835 / 2019

The Effect of a Leniency Rule on Cartel Formation and Stability: Experiments with Open Communication

Cartels can severely harm social welfare. Competition authorities introduced leniency rules to destabilize existing cartels and hinder the formation of new ones. Empirically, it is difficult to judge the success of these measures because functioning cartels are unobservable. Existing experimental studies confirm that a leniency rule indeed reduces cartelization. We extend these studies by having a ...

2019| Maximilian Andres, Lisa Bruttel, Jana Friedrichsen
Diskussionspapiere 1824 / 2019

Social Status Concerns and the Political Economy of Publicly Provided Private Goods

We analyze the political economy of the public provision of private goods when individuals care about their social status. Status concerns motivate richer individuals to vote for the public provision of goods they themselves buy in markets: a higher provision level attracts more individuals to the public sector, enhancing the social exclusivity of market purchases. Majority voting may lead to a public ...

2019| Jana Friedrichsen, Tobias König, Tobias Lausen
Diskussionspapiere 1752 / 2018

Social Image Concerns and Welfare Take-Up

Using a laboratory experiment, we present first evidence that social image concerns causally reduce the take-up of an individually beneficial transfer. Our design manipulates the informativeness of the take-up decision by varying whether transfer eligibility is based on ability or luck, and how the transfer is financed. We find that subjects avoid the inference both of being low-skilled (ability stigma) ...

2018| Jana Friedrichsen, Tobias König, Renke Schmacker
Diskussionspapiere 1644 / 2017

Is Socially Responsible Production a Normal Good?

This paper uses a controlled laboratory experiment to investigate the effect of wealth on individual social responsibility (ISR), defined as choosing a more socially responsible product if a cheaper alternative is available. We find that rich consumers are significantly less likely to engage in ISR than poor consumers. This suggests that socially responsible production conditions may not be normal ...

2017| Jana Friedrichsen
Diskussionspapiere 1634 / 2017

Who Cares about Social Image?

This paper experimentally investigates how concerns for social approval relate to intrinsic motivations to purchase ethically. Participants state their willingness-to-pay for both a fair trade and a conventional chocolate bar in private or publicly. A standard model of social image predicts that all increase their fair trade premium when facing an audience. We find that the premium is higher in public ...

2017| Jana Friedrichsen, Dirk Engelmann
DIW Roundup 137 / 2020

Why Are We Eating so Much Meat?

There are various reasons why humans may want to reduce their consumption of meat and other animal products. In the following, we lay out important stylized facts about individual meat consumption, and then discuss the challenges and puzzles surrounding effective behavior change toward more sustainable, plant-based diets.

2020| Jana Friedrichsen, Manja Gärtner
37 results, from 11
keyboard_arrow_up