Skip to content!

SOEPpapers

Editors and Hints for Authors

The SOEPpapers are the chief platform for publishing research results based on SOEP data. As SOEP is a multidisciplinary panel, the SOEPpapers publishes work from all social scientific disciplines.

close
Go to page
remove add
1188 results, from 1
  • SOEPpapers 1191 / 2023

    Using Within-Person Change in Three Large Panel Studies to Estimate Personality Age Trajectories

    How does personality change when people get older? Numerous studies have investigated this question, overall supporting the idea of so-called personality maturation. However, heterogeneous findings have left open questions, such as whether maturation continues in old age and how large the effects are. We suggest that the heterogeneity is partly rooted in methodological issues. First, studies may have ...

    2023| Ingo S. Seifert, Julia M. Rohrer, Stefan C. Schmukle
  • SOEPpapers 1190 / 2023

    Job Levels and Wages

    Job levels summarize the complexity, autonomy, and responsibility of task execution. Conceptually, job levels are related to the organization of production, are distinct from occupations, and can be constructed from data on task execution. We highlight their empirical role in matched employer-employee data for life-cycle wage dynamics, refine a task-based view of wage determination, and demonstrate ...

    2023| Christian Bayer, Moritz Kuhn
  • SOEPpapers 1189 / 2023

    Maternal Life Satisfaction and Child Development from Toddlerhood to Adolescence

    In this paper we analyse the association between maternal well-being and child development at different ages. We use data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) which captures maternal life satisfaction and numerous cognitive and non-cognitive child development outcomes. We identify a strong positive association between mothers’ life satisfaction and their children’s development when these are ...

    2023| Nabanita Datta Gupta, Jonas Jessen, C. Katharina Spiess
  • SOEPpapers 1188 / 2023

    Intergenerational Scars: The Impact of Parental Unemployment on Individual Health Later in Life

    This paper studies whether individuals that experienced parental unemployment during their childhood/early adolescence have poorer health once they reach the adulthood. We used data from the German Socio-Economic Panel from 2002 until 2018. Our identification strategy of the causal effect of parental unemployment relied on plant closures as exogenous variation of the individual labor market condition. ...

    2023| Michele Ubaldi, Matteo Picchio
  • SOEPpapers 1187 / 2023

    Pension Reforms and Couples’ Labour Supply Decisions

    To determine how wives’ and husbands’ retirement options affect their spouses’ (and their own) labour supply decisions, we exploit (early) retirement cutoffs by way of a regression discontinuity design. Several German pension reforms since the early 1990s have gradually raised women’s retirement age from 60 to 65, but also increased ages for several early retirement pathways affecting both sexes. We ...

    2023| Hamed Markazi Moghadam, Patrick A. Puhani, Joanna Tyrowicz
  • SOEPpapers 1186 / 2023

    Health Implications of Building Retrofits: Evidence from a Population-Wide Weatherization Program

    What is the impact of housing upgrades on occupant health? Although economists and policymakers are certain about the health implications of housing upgrades, empirical evidence is largely missing or else only based on small-scale experiments in developing countries. This study provides the first population-representative quasi-experimental estimates based on a large-scale refurbishment program that ...

    2023| Steffen Künn, Juan Palacios
  • SOEPpapers 1185 / 2023

    Public Employment Agency Reform, Matching Efficiency, and German Unemployment

    Our paper analyzes the role of public employment agencies in job matching, in particular the effects of the restructuring of the Federal Employment Agency in Germany (Hartz III labor market reform) for aggregate matching and unemployment. Based on two microeconomic datasets, we show that the market share of the Federal Employment Agency as job intermediary declined after the Hartz reforms. We propose ...

    2023| Christian Merkl, Timo Sauerbier
  • SOEPpapers 1184 / 2023

    There’s More in the Data! Using Month-Specific Information to Estimate Changes Before and After Major Life Events

    Sociological research is increasingly using panel data to examine changes in diverse outcomes over life course events. Most of these studies have one striking similarity: they analyse changes between yearly time intervals. In this paper, we present a simple but effective method to model such trajectories more precisely using available data. The approach exploits month-specific information regarding ...

    2023| Ansgar Hudde, Marita Jacob
  • SOEPpapers 1183 / 2023

    Forced Migration and Social Cohesion: Evidence from the 2015/16 Mass Inflow in Germany

    A commonly expressed concern about immigration is that it undermines social cohesion in the receiving country. In this paper, we study the impact of a large and sudden inflow of asylum seekers on several indicators of social cohesion. In 2015/16, over one million asylum seekers from Syria, Afghanistan, and elsewhere arrived in Germany. Anecdotal evidence suggests that this inflow changed the public opinion ...

    2023| Emanuele Albarosa, Benjamin Elsner
  • SOEPpapers 1182 / 2023

    Punching up or Punching down? How Stereotyping the Rich and the Poor Impacts Redistributive Preferences in Germany

    Redistribution and the welfare state have been linked by academic discourse to narratives that portray specific societal groups as ‘deserving’ or ‘undeserving’. The present analysis contributes to this scholarship in a twofold manner. First, it provides a holistic view on the beneficiaries and benefactors of welfare and asks how the public perception of the rich and the poor drives redistributive preferences. ...

    2023| Matthias Diermeier, Madeleine L. Fischer, Judith Niehues
  • SOEPpapers 1181 / 2023

    Holding the Door Slightly Open: Germany’s Migrants’ Return Intentions and Realizations

    Return migration intentions are complex and are not necessarily followed by future return migration. Our study compares successful return or repeated migration with self-declared return intentions. We take advantage of the latest German Socio-Economic Panel survey dropout studies and fieldwork to observe a wider return migration window than reported in the literature to answer the question of whether ...

    2023| Hend Sallam
  • SOEPpapers 1180 / 2023

    Is There a Union Wage Premium in Germany and Which Workers Benefit Most?

    Using representative data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP), this paper finds a statistically significant union wage premium in Germany of almost three percent which is not simply a collective bargaining premium. Given that the union membership fee is typically about one percent of workers’ gross wages, this finding suggests that it pays off to be a union member. Our results show that the ...

    2023| Marina Bonaccolto-Töpfer, Claus Schnabel
  • SOEPpapers 1179 / 2022

    Minimum Wage in Germany: Countering the Wage and Employment Gap between Migrants and Natives?

    This paper investigates the effects of the introduction of a statutory minimum wage in Germany on the wages and employment of migrants. Migrants are an overrepresented group in the low-wage sector and can be expected to particularly benefit from a minimum wage. We combine a “differential trend adjusted difference-in-differences estimator” (DTADD) and descriptive evidence to evaluate the impact of the ...

    2022| Kai Ingwersen, Stephan L. Thomsen
  • SOEPpapers 1178 / 2022

    Gender, Loneliness and Happiness during COVID-19

    We analyse a measure of loneliness from a representative sample of German individuals interviewed in both 2017 and at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. Both men and women felt lonelier during the COVID-19 pandemic than they did in 2017. The pandemic more than doubled the gender loneliness gap: women were lonelier than men in 2017, and the 2017-2020 rise in loneliness was far larger for ...

    2022| Anthony Lepinteur, Andrew E. Clark, Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell, Alan Piper, Carsten Schröder, Conchita D'Ambrosio
  • SOEPpapers 1177 / 2022

    Income Misperception and Populism

    We propose that false beliefs about the own current economic status are an important factor for explaining populist attitudes. Along with the subjects' receptiveness to right-wing populism, we elicit their perceived relative income positions in a representative survey of German households. We find that people with pessimistic beliefs about their income position are more attuned to populist statements. ...

    2022| Thilo N. H. Albers, Felix Kersting, Fabian Kosse
  • SOEPpapers 1176 / 2022

    A Glimpse of Freedom: Allied Occupation and Political Resistance in East Germany

    This paper exploits the idiosyncratic line of contact separating Allied and Soviet troops within East Germany at the end of WWII to study political resistance in a non-democracy. When Nazi Germany surrendered, 40% of what would become the authoritarian German Democratic Republic was initially under Allied control but was ceded to Soviet control less than two months later. Brief Allied exposure increased ...

    2022| Luis R. Martinez, Jonas Jessen, Guo Xu
  • SOEPpapers 1175 / 2022

    Trust We Lost: The Impact of the Treuhand Experience on Political Alienation in East Germany

    Do politically administered mass layoffs undermine trust and political interest? During the German reunification, formerly state-owned socialist firms in East Germany were privatized by the Treuhand, which came at the cost of massive job losses and public protest. I demonstrate that these activities had a detrimental effect on attitudes and political behavior of the affected individuals. Using survey ...

    2022| Kim Leonie Kellermann
  • SOEPpapers 1174 / 2022

    Exposure to Past Immigration Waves and Attitudes toward Newcomers

    How does previous exposure to massive immigrant inflows affect concerns about current immigration and the integration of refugees? To answer this question, we investigate attitudes toward newcomers among natives and previous immigrants. In areas that in the 1990s received higher inflows of immigrants of German origin—so-called ethnic Germans—native Germans are more likely to believe that refugees are ...

    2022| Rania Gihleb, Osea Giuntella, Luca Stella
  • SOEPpapers 1173 / 2022

    Wealth and Its Distribution in Germany, 1895-2018

    German history over the past 125 years has been turbulent. Marked by two world wars, revolutions and major regime changes, as well as a hyperinflation and three currency reforms, expropriations and territorial divisions, it provides unique insights into the role of country-specific shocks in shaping long-run wealth dynamics. This paper presents the first comprehensive study of wealth and its distribution ...

    2022| Thilo N. H. Albers, Charlotte Bartels, Moritz Schularick
  • SOEPpapers 1172 / 2022

    Personality Growth after Relationship Losses: Changes of Perceived Control in the Years around Separation, Divorce, and the Death of a Partner

    Background: Previous research suggests that romantic relationships play a crucial role for perceived control. However, we know surprisingly little about changes in perceived control before and after the end of romantic relationships. Methods: Based on data from the Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP), a nationally representative household panel study from Germany, we examined changes of perceived control ...

    2022| Eva Asselmann, Jule Specht
1188 results, from 1
keyboard_arrow_up